In Subjects
 
Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Vol. I

Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Vol. I

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Excerpt:

n can become, not by yielding himself freely to impressions, not by letting nature play freely through him, but by a single thought, an earnest purpose, an indomitable will, by hardihood, self-command, and force of expression. Architecture was the art in which Rome excelled, and this corresponds with the feeling these men of Rome excite. They did not grow,--they built themselves up, or were built up by the fate of Rome, as a temple for Jupiter Stator. The ruined Roman sits among the ruins; he flies to no green garden; he does not look to heaven; if his intent is defeated, if he is less than he meant to be, he lives no more. The names which end in "_us_," seem to speak with lyric cadence. That measured cadence,--that tramp and march,--which are not stilted, because they indicate real force, yet which seem so when compared with any other language,--make Latin a study in itself of mighty influence. The language alone, without the literature, would g